To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $19m to 237 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

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New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
8
237
$1,010,554
$19,288,301
8
229
$1,085,063
$18,277,747
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2011

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Randomised controlled trial of timed voiding using an alarm watch vs standard watch for the treatment of daytime urinary incontinence in children   The University of Sydney
$163,920
2 Years
Application No: 2011-224Chief Investigator: Dr Patrina Caldwell
Project Title:
Randomised controlled trial of timed voiding using an alarm watch vs standard watch for the treatment of daytime urinary incontinence in children

We propose to conduct a randomized controlled trial to compare a personalized alarm watch against a standard watch for enhancing timed voiding for treating daytime urinary incontinence in children. 360 children aged 5-13 years with daytime urinary incontinence will be randomized to timed voiding with either a personalized alarm watch or a standard watch for months. Primary outcome of interest will be incontinence cure rates for both watches at 3 months.

Intergenerational pathways of psychosocial disadvantage and wellbeing: A three-generation study of grandparents, parents and children in the Australian Temperament Project (1983-2010)   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$79,841
1 Year
Application No: 2011-212Chief Investigator: Dr Craig Olsson
Project Title:
Intergenerational pathways of psychosocial disadvantage and wellbeing: A three-generation study of grandparents, parents and children in the Australian Temperament Project (1983-2010)

The Australian Temperament Project is one of Australia's most mature longitudinal studies of health and wellbeing. The study has captured unique information from parents and children over a 28-year period. The ATP children have now grown up and are having children of their own. This gives us an exceedingly rare opportunity to understand how patterns of health and wellbeing are handed down across the generations - from grandparents to parents to children - to inform new directions in preventive intervention.

'Move It To Improve It' (MiTii) Australia: Efficacy of a Web-Based Multimodal Intervention for Children with Cerebral Palsy.   The University Of Queensland, Queensland Cerebral Palsy Research & Rehabilitation Centre, The School of Medicine
$160,000
2 Years
Application No: 2011-210Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Roslyn Boyd
Project Title:
'Move It To Improve It' (MiTii) Australia: Efficacy of a Web-Based Multimodal Intervention for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

Our team wishes to test the effectiveness of an internet based multimodal therapy (MiTii: 'Move it To improve it') which combines upper limb training and physical activity in children's homes. The program combines visual perception and cognitive skills training, important aspects of activity engagement and participation in a virtual training environment. The feasibility of delivering MiTii has been confirmed in a pilot study of 19 children in Denmark achieving on average 35 minutes of training daily for 20 weeks with 96 percent compliance. Children made significant gains in motor and processing skills, self esteem, functional strength and visual perception. The program requires only three therapists (physiotherapist, occupational therapist and psychologist) to train 98 children. As current therapy programs are resource intensive and time consuming it is important to determine if gains from a minimally resourced remote, web based program such as MiTii are sustained over a 12 month period as this could offer a cost effective, timely model of care, particularly for rural, remote and isolated children with CP.

Finding a Cure for Peanut Allergy   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$160,000
2 Years
Application No: 2011-164Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Mimi Tang
Project Title:
Finding a Cure for Peanut Allergy

Food allergy affects ~10% of children and rates are rising. The greatest rise has occurred in children under the age of 5yr. Currently, there is no cure for food allergy. Management relies on food avoidance, which is difficult to achieve. Recent deaths in children from food allergy highlight the need for an effective treatment. This clinical trial will test a novel treatment for peanut allergy. If effective we will have a proof of principle for treatment of all food allergy.

Preventing dental decay in young children from disadvantaged communities   The University of Melbourne
$159,903
2 Years
Application No: 2011-161Chief Investigator: Dr Andrea de Silva-Sanigorski
Project Title:
Preventing dental decay in young children from disadvantaged communities

Dental decay is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. To examine the bacterial, environmental and social factors involved in the development of tooth decay we have enrolled 450 children from disadvantaged families into the VicGen prospective birth cohort. Data has been collected at child age 1, 6, 12 and 18 months and we propose to extend the study to when the children are aged 2_ years; providing powerful prospective, longitudinal data during a critical developmental period.

Are low neonatal vitamin D stored associated with an increased risk of Multiple Sclerosis during Childhood?   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$124,746
2 Years
Application No: 2011-056Chief Investigator: Professor Anne-Loiuse Ponsonby
Project Title:
Are low neonatal vitamin D stored associated with an increased risk of Multiple Sclerosis during Childhood?

This work builds on our report in the British Medical Journal in 2010 that mothers who experienced lower sunlight levels during early pregnancy were more likely to have offspring who later developed multiple sclerosis (MS). We now are investigating if children who develop MS have either lower vitamin D levels at birth and/or lower sun exposure during early postnatal life. The study design is a case control study where children with early onset MS are compared to healthy controls.

Can a pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) reduce the frequency of NTHi infection in the lower airway (defined by >10E4 cfu/ml bronchoalveolar lavage) and upper airway (nasopharynx) colonisation of children with chronic suppurative lung disease?   Menzies School of Health Research
$160,000
2 Years
Application No: 2011-019Chief Investigator: Professor Anne Chang
Project Title:
Can a pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) reduce the frequency of NTHi infection in the lower airway (defined by >10E4 cfu/ml bronchoalveolar lavage)

A new vaccine that targets the most common infection (NTHi) in the lungs of children with bronchiectasis is now available. We will assess if this vaccine is effective in reducing NTHi airway infection in children who have been immunised with this new vaccine. If effective, all children at risk of the airway infection would likely benefit from the use of this vaccine. We will also study the immune response of children who have and have not received this vaccine.

Total 2011    
$1,008,410