To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $19m to 237 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

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New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
8
244
$1,093,348
$20,226,748
8
236
$1,010,554
$19,133,400
7
228
$930,162
$18,122,846
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2012

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Regulation of myelination Intrauterine Growth Restriction: identification of potential therapeutic targets   Monash University
$142,578
2 Years
Application No: 2012-214Chief Investigator: Dr Mary Tolcos
Project Title:
Regulation of myelination Intrauterine Growth Restriction: identification of potential therapeutic targets

Growth-restricted babies are often born with brain damage, and then grow up with disabilities such as cerebral palsy and/or learning and behavioural problems. A major challenge for the obstetrician and scientist is to identify why poor fetal growth can lead to brain injury - in particular, to abnormal development of white matter. With this knowledge we will be able to design treatments that prevent this type of brain injury and improve childhood health.

Optimising sleep for Australian children: Understanding the effects of daytime sleep periods in childcare services   Queensland Univerity of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedial Innovation
$158,560
2 Years
Application No: 2012-213Chief Investigator: Professor Karen Thorpe
Project Title:
Optimising sleep for Australian children: Understanding the effects of daytime sleep periods in childcare services

Emerging evidence suggests that compulsory sleep times in childcare may adversely affect child well-being and health. Most 4 year olds do not require day-time sleep, yet 50% of centres have compulsory sleep-times without alternative activities. Such practise is potentially stressful and disruptive for night sleep and attendant long-term health. This study compares a range of physiological and psychological child outcomes across centres with compulsory and child-centred sleep practices during the child�s final year of attendance and in the following year.

Understanding the effect of preterm birth on brain blood flow and subsequent brain injury   The Ritchie Centre, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University
$154,592
2 Years
Application No: 2012-142Chief Investigator: Dr Graeme Polglase
Project Title:
Understanding the effect of preterm birth on brain blood flow and subsequent brain injury

Making the transition from fetus to neonate is one of the greatest physiological challenges; this is even more challenging for preterm babies. These babies need to cope with extreme changes to blood flow within the lung, heart and brain and subsequently this can result in brain injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. This application will focus on developing simple techniques at delivery, to prevent adverse outcomes related to poor circulation at preterm birth.

CardioCAPS: Determining the effects of the transition through puberty on vascular structure and function at age 14 years   The University of Sydney
$116,406
2 Years
Application No: 2012-114Chief Investigator: Dr Julian Ayer
Project Title:
CardioCAPS: Determining the effects of the transition through puberty on vascular structure and function at age 14 years

Significant changes occur in body composition, sensitivity to insulin, lipoprotein levels, blood pressure and hormones during pregnancy. We aim to determine the effect of the transition through puberty on vascular structure and function. We aim to examine which factors of pubertal development influence cardiovascular health. This project will provide information that will better inform prevention programs that target adolescents and aim to reduce the burden of future cardiovascular disease.

Optimising pertussis vaccination in infants: a new approach   Children's Hospital Westmead
$150,000
2 Years
Application No: 2012-083Chief Investigator: Dr Nicholas Wood
Project Title:
Optimising pertussis vaccination in infants: a new approach

Australia is currently experiencing a pertussis (whooping cough) epidemic. Infants under 4 months old are too young to be protected by our current vaccine schedule and older children, aged 3- 5 years old have waning immunity from their last pertussis vaccine resulting in high rates of pertussis. The aim of this study is to see if 2 early pertussis vaccine doses, prior to 4 months old, and a later booster dose at 12 months gives the same immune responses after 2 doses and better responses following a later 3rd dose than the current standard schedule.

Developing more accurate measures of immune response and vaccine efficacy of standard and novel schedules of two new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevenar13 or Synflorix) in indigenous infants   Menzies School of Health Research
$159,548
2 Years
Application No: 2012-057Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Amanda Leach
Project Title:
Developing more accurate measures of immune response and vaccine efficacy of standard and novel schedules of two new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevenar13 or Synflorix) in indigenous infants

Our PREV-IX_COMBO trial of PREVenar13 and SynflorIX10 aims to determine whether a schedule of both vaccines, potentially maximising protection from all vaccine components, may be most beneficial for high risk children. Immune correlates are globally recognised as the most cost effective way to evaluate expanded conjugate vaccines and different schedules. At the same time, important inconsistencies have emerged. Linking this FFC project with data from the PREV-IX_COMBO trial will support evidence based decisions for PCVs in high risk children

Cardioinflammatory markers in neonates born to
overweight or obese women
  The University of Adelaide
$79,474
1 Year
Application No: 2012-016Chief Investigator: Dr Lisa Moran
Project Title:
Cardioinflammatory markers in neonates born to overweight or obese women

Excess weight gain during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity and subsequent elevated risk for developing cardiovascular disease later in life. While lifestyle programs are recommended during pregnancy to limit excess weight gain, there is no research assessing their effect on childhood cardiovascular disease risk. This project will assess the effect of an antenatal lifestyle intervention designed to limit excess weight gain in overweight and obese pregnant women on infant obesity and cardiovascular risk.

Developmental pathways of children with autism and
developmental delay: What can early skills and behaviour teach us?
  Monash University
$159,902
2 Years
Application No: 2012-007Chief Investigator: Dr Kylie Gray
Project Title:
Developmental pathways of children with autism and developmental delay:
What can early skills and behaviour teach us?

This study aims to determine whether there are early markers of developmental outcomes (eg learning and language skills) in primary school children with autism.

To answer this question, we will follow-up the development of young children from early childhood to late primary school. Understanding of these markers of child outcomes will lead to an improved understanding of the pathways to successful development and adjustment. This will facilitate the identification of specific early interventions to aid in improving outcomes for children.

Total 2012    
$1,121,060