To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $19m to 237 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

Make an online donation

New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
8
245
$1,093,348
$20,381,649
8
237
$1,010,554
$19,288,301
8
229
$1,085,063
$18,277,747
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2013

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Novel treatment for Paediatric OCD: Improving client access to treatment & outcomes   Griffith University
$87,800
2 Years
Application No: 2013-277Chief Investigator: Dr L Farrell
Project Title:
Novel treatment for Paediatric OCD: Improving client access to treatment & outcomes

This project examines the efficacy of a novel treatment for children who suffer from highly debilitating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in order to improve access to treatment and child outcomes. The active novel treatment involves 2-sessions intensive exposure therapy, coupled with anti-tuberculosis drug d-Cycloserine (DCS), recently been shown to improve outcomes when given prior to exposure therapy, through enhancing learning processes. This study involves a randomized controlled trial and examines outcomes up to 6 months follow-up.

Can we predict cerebral palsy at birth?   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$79,768
1 Year
Application No: 2013-207Chief Investigator: Dr J Craig
Project Title:
Can we predict cerebral palsy at birth?

Cerebral palsy describes a number of debilitating conditions involving impaired movement due to brain damage early in life. Although cerebral palsy mostly originates before birth, diagnosis often has to wait until the second year of life. We propose that 'gene switches' known to be influenced by the environment in the womb can be used to identify which babies will develop cerebral palsy, enabling immediate intervention to help lessen the symptoms of this condition.

Systemic gene expression and the economic cost of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children: Enhancement of a NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial.   University of Queensland
$159,047
2 Years
Application No: 2013-126Chief Investigator: Prof A B Chang
Project Title:
Systemic gene expression and the economic cost of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children: Enhancement of a NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial.

This proposed study is embedded within an already funded multicentre randomised controlled trial. It provides an unique opportunity to study two additional novel components that has never been studied in people with bronchiectasis. The first component aims to determine if a blood marker can be used to predict a respiratory exacerbation. The second is an evaluation of the economic costs of bronchiectasis. The results of this will potentially alter clinical practice and inform public health policy.

Decreasing neutrophil activation, infiltration and damage in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection: a means to ameliorate infant bronchiolitis.   Flinders University
$129,172
2 Years
Application No: 2013-100Chief Investigator: Dr D Dixon
Project Title:
Decreasing neutrophil activation, infiltration and damage in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection: a means to ameliorate infant bronchiolitis.

Bronchiolitis is the most common severe respiratory tract illness in infants and remains a major cause of hospitalisation. Apart from supportive intervention, there is no treatment. We have found that during bronchiolitis immune cells damage the lung, increasing disease severity and leading to asthma/wheeze in approximately 50% of patients. Recently our lab demonstrated the ability of a protein, feG, to treat such lung damage. We aim to test the therapeutic potential of feG in decreasing lung damage caused by bronchiolitis.

eADVICE (electronic Advice and Diagnosis Via the Internet following Computerised Evaluation): Interactive e-Health tools for shared health management between patients, general practitioners and specialists.   The University of Sydney
$160,000
2 Years
Application No: 2013-094Chief Investigator: Dr P Caldwell
Project Title:
eADVICE (electronic Advice and Diagnosis Via the Internet following Computerised Evaluation): Interactive e-Health tools for shared health management between patients, general practitioners and specialists.

This project involves the development and piloting of the eADVICE-incontinence© program. This program, which is supervised by GPs, mimics multiple visits to a specialist paediatric continence service. It combines assessment, diagnosis, tailored treatment advice, monitoring and feedback and well as education of the GP and families. Parents can also input further information about their child's progress, with modification of the ongoing treatment advice. The program will then be piloted on 50 children with urinary incontinence.

Modelling intrauterine inflammation in second trimester pregnancy to prevent early preterm birth and improve neonatal outcomes   The University of Western Australia
$130,200
2 Years
Application No: 2013-059Chief Investigator: Dr M Kemp
Project Title:
Modelling intrauterine inflammation in second trimester pregnancy to prevent early preterm birth and improve neonatal outcomes

Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal death and disease in Australia. Although infection and inflammation are established as the primary causes of early preterm birth, we do not understand how they impact the fetus early in pregnancy.

Our new second trimester sheep model will allow us to study infection and inflammation in early pregnancy. This study will help us understand how early preterm birth occurs and help develop treatments to improve the health of babies and their mothers.

Whose behaviour is and is not managed in the early years of school, why and with what effects?   Macquarie University
$125,175
2 Years
Application No: 2013-030Chief Investigator: Dr L Graham
Project Title:
Whose behaviour is and is not managed in the early years of school, why and with what effects?

Exclusion of disruptive students has increased significantly in recent years. Research suggests that the seeds to this problem are sown in the first few years of school and that many children referred to separate settings remain until they drop out or enter juvenile detention. This research will track 200 children through the early school years to understand how and why some students do not benefit from common behaviour management practices and what supports are needed to avert such negative trajectories.

Clinical and Genetic Basis of Sudden Unexplained Death in Children   Centenary Institute, University of Sydney
$160,000
2 Years
Application No: 2013-017Chief Investigator: Prof C Semsarian
Project Title:
Clinical and Genetic Basis of Sudden Unexplained Death in Children

Sudden unexplained death in children is a tragic event that can cause further devastating consequences to living family and friends of the deceased child. This proposed Australia-wide research initiative will shed light on the genetic cardiac causes of sudden unexplained death in children, enable clinical screening of at-risk family relatives, and allow the initiation of appropriate therapeutic and preventative strategies, with the primary goal to reduce the incidence of sudden death amongst children in Australia.

Total 2013    
$1,031,162