To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $19m to 237 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

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New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
8
244
$1,093,348
$20,226,748
8
236
$1,010,554
$19,133,400
7
228
$930,162
$18,122,846
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2014

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Using polymer technology to deliver human nerve progenitors into the colon of new-born patients with a birth defect of colonic nerves   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$136,454
2 Years
Application No: 2014-211Chief Investigator: Dr D Newgreen
Project Title:
Using polymer technology to deliver human nerve progenitors into the colon of new-born patients with a birth defect of colonic nerves
We propose a novel cell replacement therapy for Hirschsprung Disease, a fatal disease where the distal colon lacks nerves. We will use patients gut cells to obtain the ‘right’ cell type (from same patient to avoid immune rejection, and of the nerve cell family), reprogram them to the ‘right’ stage (quasi-embryonic progenitor cell stage), expand them to the ‘right’ numbers for therapy using novel polymer growth surface, and test them for the ‘right’ nerve-forming ability in Hirschsprung patient colon tissue.
Childhood exposure to environmental pollutants in Australia - an investigation of sources and effects for informing legislation   Queensland University of Technology
$59,961
1 Year
Application No: 2014-167Chief Investigator: Dr F Harden
Project Title:
Childhood exposure to environmental pollutants in Australia - an investigation of sources and effects for informing legislation
Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are chemicals that accumulate in the environment.  Common POPs include: dioxins, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), triclosan, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and polyfluoralkyl chemicals (PFCs).

Humans are exposed via food, household equipment, dust, air and water.  POPs are reported to have a variety of adverse effects in humans and animals including cancer, immune, reproductive and hormonal effects.  Children are particularly vulnerable to their effects.  This project will determine the concentration of a range of these chemicals in children as well as potential sources of exposure in their environment.
Using a simple exercise intervention for reducing adverse reactions and boosting immune response to HPV vaccination   The University of Sydney
$150,000
2 Years
Application No: 2014-233Chief Investigator: Dr K Edwards
Project Title:
Using a simple exercise intervention for reducing adverse reactions and boosting immune response to HPV vaccination
HPV is a sexually-transmitted infection that can lead to several cancers. HPV vaccination is an important way to protect against these cancers, so it is important that vaccination rates are high and teenage girls and boys complete all 3 doses of vaccines. Exercising at the time of getting the vaccine might be a way to stop some of the side effects children often experience, like pain and redness, and improve the experience of vaccination, helping improve vaccination rates.
Identifying underlying causes of craniofacial defects in newborns   Deakin University, School of Medicine
$118,728
2 Years
Application No: 2014-058Chief Investigator: Dr D McCulloch
Project Title:
Identifying underlying causes of craniofacial defects in newborns
Clefts of lip and palate (CL/P) are amongst the most common birth defects with lifelong functional, aesthetic and psychological impacts. While several genetic causes of these anomalies have been identified, the majority of cases remain unexplained. The aim of this Project is to define mechanisms underpinning these defects and to identify new genetic causes.
Can we predict health outcomes of extremely preterm birth?   Royal Children's Hospital
$147,742
2 Years
Application No: 2014-134Chief Investigator: Dr J Craig
Project Title:
Can we predict health outcomes of extremely preterm birth?
Many premature babies develop problems with their heart, lungs or brain. This group have shown that such children are born with a long-lasting legacy written on top of their genes. This legacy can be read at birth and related to the illnesses these children get as they age to adults.
Do lower airway biofilms and NETs contribute to development of chronic lung infection in children?   Menzies School of Health Research
$159,949
2 Years
Application No: 2014-114Chief Investigator: Dr R Marsh
Project Title:
Do lower airway biofilms and NETs contribute to development of chronic lung infection in children?
Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) and bronchiectasis are chronic lung diseases that cause a substantial disease burden in children- especially in indigenous children. The microbial and inflammatory mechanisms underlying these diseases are not understood.

This study will determine if biofilm (a type of bacterial growth resistant to antibiotics) and Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs / pro-inflammatory host structures) are present in lung specimens from children with PBB or bronchiectasis. This work will explore the potential of biofilm and NETs as targets for new treatments.
Prediction of Preterm Early Motor and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes   University of Queensland
$151,784
2 Years
Application No: 2014-074Chief Investigator: Prof R Boyd
Project Title:
Prediction of Preterm Early Motor and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes
The risk of cerebral palsy is greater for infants born very preterm (<31 weeks gestation); but often goes undetected until 6-24 months of age. One in 10 of these very preterm infants develop major disabilities - such as cerebral palsy and half develop clumsiness, intellectual, educational or behavioural problems.

This project will utilise advanced brain imaging with an MRI-compatible incubator permitting safe scanning at 30 weeks gestation. This will be combined with clinical measures to develop a diagnostic toolbox that will accurately predict motor and neurobehavioral outcomes.

Growing Up in Australia’s Family Health CheckPoint: Implementing an intergenerational health module for the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$80,000
1 Year
Application No: 2014-055Chief Investigator: Prof M Wake
Project Title:
Growing Up in Australia’s Family Health CheckPoint: Implementing an intergenerational health module for the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
In 2015, the landmark Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) will be enriched with a comprehensive physical health and biomakers module.

This group will develop, test and implement parallel assessments for parents of the 4,000 11-12 year old participants, efficiently creating an intergenerational health repository for all Australian researchers. 

If they demonstrate high intergenerational concordance of important outcomes, research can then focus on mechanisms - especially those that may enhance prevention (environmental, epigenetic) and/or mitigation.
Total 2014    
$1,004,618