To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $19m to 237 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

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New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
8
237
$1,010,554
$19,288,301
8
229
$1,085,063
$18,277,747
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2015

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Can a controlled low oxygen environment protect the neonatal brain?   University of New South Wales
$154,901.00
2 Years
Application No: 2015-368Chief Investigator: Prof A Cunningham
Project Title:
Can a controlled low oxygen environment protect the neonatal brain?
As a result of birth complications, many babies experience brain injury and develop cerebral palsy or other lifelong consequences affecting learning, movement or behaviour. Currently, hypothermia is the only approved treatment, but is not appropriate for all babies. We have identified an important pathway (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) which can protect against brain injury and potentially promote brain repair. Our studies have the longterm goal of developing novel treatments stimulating this pathway in order to improve quality of life for these infants.
Investigation of the role of virus-specific cell receptors in acute asthma in children   University of Western Australia
$135,610.00
2 Years
Application No: 2015-314Chief Investigator: Prof Peter Le Souef
Project Title:
Investigation of the role of virus-specific cell receptors in acute asthma in children
Over 90% of childhood asthma attacks are caused by rhinovirus (3 common species: A, B, C) or respiratory syncytial virus.  In September 2014, the last and most important of the 4 cell receptors for these viruses was discovered. We now plan, therefore, to study how each of these common viruses affects the airway by starting at the cell receptor and, by using advanced gene profiling assessment techniques, tracking in detail the key immune response pathways that lead to airway inflammation. 
The intermittent modified fast diet and insulin resistance in obese adolescents: a pilot study   The University of Sydney
$139,418.00
2 Years
Application No: 2015-301Chief Investigator: Assoc Prof S Garnett
Project Title:
The intermittent modified fast diet and insulin resistance in obese adolescents: a pilot study
Dietary interventions are generally effective in treating obesity. However, the best way to achieve weight loss, particularly in children, is unknown. In this study we will assess a novel dietary strategy, intermittent fasting (popularised as the 5:2 diet), which has demonstrated success in adults. We speculate that this diet, which includes 3 days/week of energy restriction and 4 days of habitual energy intake, may be more sustainable and lead to greater weight loss compared to daily energy restriction.
Breaking the cycle of intergenerational mental disorder: A longitudinal study of social and biological transmission in three long-standing Australian cohorts   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$118,928.00
1.5 Years
Application No: 2015-252Chief Investigator: Assoc Prof C Olsson
Project Title:
Breaking the cycle of intergenerational mental disorder: A longitudinal study of social and biological transmission in three long-standing Australian cohorts
This project will use intergenerational data from three Australian longitudinal studies that have tracked the mental health and wellbeing of several thousand participants prior to parenthood. The aim is to understand how the lives parents lived before conception, as well as events during pregnancy, shape social and emotional outcomes for their children. Data for this project are unique internationally, and have taken many years to acquire. Results will inform radically new approaches to promoting child health and development across generations.
Targeting CDK6 for treatment of childhood medulloblastoma   University of South Australia
$160,000.00
2 Years
Application No: 2015-137Chief Investigator: Prof S Wang
Project Title:
Targeting CDK6 for treatment of childhood medulloblastoma
Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour affecting children. There is poor survival and significant long-term side effects from current therapies. CDK6 is a highly activated enzyme in many patients with medulloblastoma and associated with poor prognosis. Inhibiting its activity will stop the cancer cells from proliferating, causing cell death. Our search for a drug to cure medulloblastoma has identified a novel series of CDK6 inhibitors. We will develop drug candidate as a new treatment against childhood medulloblastoma. 
Does a pregnant mother's alcohol consumption change a newborn's DNA?   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$127,220.00
2 Years
Application No: 2015-111Chief Investigator: Prof J Halliday
Project Title:
Does a pregnant mother's alcohol consumption change a newborn's DNA?
As part of a unique, population-based, multidisciplinary study, we will assess the biological legacy of specific patterns of prenatal alcohol exposure on cheek cells from newborn babies. Gene activity in cheek cells can mirror that in the brain. We are particularly focused on very early alcohol exposure, before pregnancy awareness, as this is a common occurrence in our population. We will also determine whether a biological epigenetic legacy can be used to predict health outcomes in children.
Clinical trial of Zoledronic acid (Aclasta) in children and adolescents with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)   Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
$149,017.52
2 Years
Application No: 2015-014Chief Investigator: Prof M Zacharin
Project Title:
Clinical trial of Zoledronic acid (Aclasta) in children and adolescents with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)
The research team have so far undertaken a single site pilot study over 12 months, using the same protocol and have demonstrated that none of our intervention participants have developed crush fractures since the start of Zoledronic acid treatment, whereas all control participants have developed at least one crush fracture within 12 months. Other children’s hospitals have expressed significant interest in the study. The results of this trial if positive, would have far reaching consequences in terms of potential reduction in morbidity, hospitalisation and immobilisation of affected boys. Results will inform practice worldwide, providing improved standard clinical care for these patients, thus leading to improved patient quality of life and improved family burden of care for boys with DMD and their families.
The effects of mass drug administration on scabies and strongyloidiasis prevalence five years later   Menzies School of Health Research
$99,968.66
1 Year
Application No: 2015-043Chief Investigator: Dr T Kearns
Project Title:
The effects of mass drug administration on scabies and strongyloidiasis prevalence five years later
Scabies and strongyloidiasis are widespread in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander communities. In 2010 and 2011 we conducted ivermectin mass drug administrations and trialled a non-invasive collection method (dried blood spots collected from a finger prick) that was used in an adapted detection tool (NIE-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) to diagnose strongyloidiasis. This follow-up study will measure disease occurrence 5 years after two ivermectin mass drug administrations and changes to public health policy and practice.
Total 2015    
$1,085,063