To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $21m to 253 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

Make an online donation

New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
9
253
$1,257,454
$21,484.202
8
244
$1,093,348
$20,226,748
8
236
$1,010,554
$19,133,400
7
228
$930,162
$18,122,846
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2018

⬆ back to top
Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Curing Blindness Using Novel Gene Delivery Vectors that Target Human Retina   Children's Medical Research Institute
$160,000.00
2
Application No: 2018-218Chief Investigator: Dr Leszek Lisowski
Project Title:
Curing Blindness Using Novel Gene Delivery Vectors that Target Human Retina
Retinal eye diseases affect light-sensing pathways of the eye, resulting in vision impairment in millions of children worldwide. Currently there are no available treatments. We will use advances in vector and genomic technologies to develop new ways to efficiently and safely deliver therapeutic genes to affected cells in paediatric patients, to stop disease progression before irreversible changes leading to blindness occur. This project is the initial step to bring our new technology to the clinic, to cure blindness in children.
Understanding the causes of skill loss (regression) in children with autism   Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital
$127,425.00
2
Application No: 2018-194Chief Investigator: Professor Katrina Williams
Project Title:
Understanding the causes of skill loss (regression) in children with autism
Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of social-communication and restricted/repetitive behaviours. One subgroup of children show typical development before losing skills ('autistic regression') and then being diagnosed with autism. Although this onset of autism is well described, little is known about the sequence of skill loss, the biological mechanisms that produce it, and best practice for care once identified. We will establish a cohort of children with 'autistic regression' to enable clinical and discovery research to find causes and improve care.
Improving the transition at birth of infants born by vaginal delivery: a trial of early versus delayed Oxytocin administration.   Hudson Institute of Medical Research
$72,738.00
1
Application No: 2018-183Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Graeme Polglase
Project Title:
Improving the transition at birth of infants born by vaginal delivery: a trial of early versus delayed Oxytocin administration.
Delaying umbilical cord clamping (DCC) for a set time after birth is becoming standard care across the world due to improvements in wellbeing for preterm and term infants. However, the use of oxytocin, which stimulates strong uterine contractions and reduces maternal bleeding, before the baby is removed from the umbilical cord may reduce all benefits of DCC. This study will determine whether delaying oxytocin until after DCC is safe for the mother, and provides greater benefits for the newborn baby.
Non-invasive detection of rejection after heart transplantation in children   Murdoch's Children Research Institute
$160,000.00
2
Application No: 2018-150Chief Investigator: Professor Igor Konstantinov
Project Title:
Non-invasive detection of rejection after heart transplantation in children
Patients undergoing HT require life-long monitoring for rejection. Currently, prevention of rejection is guided by invasive and expensive heart biopsies. We have previously developed a genetic test for determining early rejection with approximately 80% accuracy, and identified genetic markers of immune cells that are involved in rejection. We aim to investigate these immune cells in blood samples taken after heart transplantation. This assessment of immune cells will likely result in a clinically applicable, non-invasive test for diagnosing transplant rejection.
Caring for Children after a Concussion: Uptake, Outcomes, and Health Care Impacts of a Patient-Driven Technology-Assisted Clinical Care Pathway   The University of Queensland
$159,783.00
2
Application No: 2018-102Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Karen M. Barlow
Project Title:
Caring for Children after a Concussion: Uptake, Outcomes, and Health Care Impacts of a Patient-Driven Technology-Assisted Clinical Care Pathway
Clinical pathways are tools that enable health professionals deliver optimal care using the best available evidence. They translate clinical guidelines into practical step-by-step processes of care. In collaboration with a similar Canadian initiative, this project will adapt practice guidelines for the management of concussion into clinical pathways that can be used in hospital and community settings in Australia. We will design interactive web applications and text messaging systems (tested by Australian patients and families) to facilitate recovery from concussion.
Do immunosuppressive medications during pregnancy affect the infant immune system and response to vaccines: A pilot study?   Sydney Children's Hospital Network - The Children's Hospital at Westmead
$120,000.00
2
Application No: 2018-067Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Nicholas Wood
Project Title:
Do immunosuppressive medications during pregnancy affect the infant immune system and response to vaccines: A pilot study?
Immunosuppressive medications taken during pregnancy cross the placenta into a woman's baby and can have a negative impact on a baby's immune system. For this reason there are safety and efficacy concerns around vaccination in infancy. However, the impact is not well studied. This project aims to study the effect of immunosuppressive medications taken during pregnancy on the mother and baby's immune responses to recommended vaccines to generate new knowledge of significant importance for pregnant women and their clinicians.
Evaluation of the effectiveness and cost-saving of a mobile teledentistry in a community-based dental screening amongst Australian school children   University of Western Australia
$159,890.00
2
Application No: 2018-065Chief Investigator: W/Professor Marc Tennant
Project Title:
Evaluation of the effectiveness and cost-saving of a mobile teledentistry in a community-based dental screening amongst Australian school children
Employing oral health professionals other than dentists and embracing telehealth, in dental screening, could facilitate identifying high-risk children at a low-cost and allow them to receive specific care, thus improving children dental health and reducing the use of resources. In view of limitations of the traditional screening approach, the proposed project aims to evaluate the use of teledentistry in community-based dental screening amongst school children, based on dental photographs obtained by a smartphone camera, for a later evaluation by OHTs.
Improving brain outcomes in the growth restricted newborn using placental stem cell treatment   The University of Queensland
$139,130.00
2
Application No: 2018-043Chief Investigator: Professor Paul Colditz
Project Title:
Improving brain outcomes in the growth restricted newborn using placental stem cell treatment
Growth restriction during pregnancy causes impaired development of the fetal brain and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes such as cerebral palsy. Currently no treatment exists to prevent brain injury in these babies. Our project is investigating a novel stem cell treatment to protect baby's brains - using the baby's own placenta.
Brain cells in a dish: strategies for novel therapeutics in CDKL5 disorder   Murdoch's Children Research Institute
$158,488.00
2
Application No: 2018-016Chief Investigator: Dr Nicole Van Bergen
Project Title:
Brain cells in a dish: strategies for novel therapeutics in CDKL5 disorder
Children with CDKL5 disorder suffer severe seizures and impairment of early brain development. There are no effective treatments and little is known about the disorder. The CDKL5 protein is essential for forming connections between neighbouring brain cells during normal brain development. We will use genetic technologies to transform skin cells from affected patients into stem cells, correct the gene mutation, and convert them to brain cells. These studies will address fundamental questions about CDKL5 disorder, and help develop new therapies.
Total 2018    
$1,257,454