To date the Foundation has allocated>
in excess of $21m to 253 projects.

The projects are focussed on promoting
the health and welfare of children in Australia.

View the latest grant recipients

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New grants for the year table

Year New grants for the year Total grants Amount granted Accumulated amount granted
7
260
$1,049,783
$22,533,985
9
253
$1,257,454
$21,484.202
8
244
$1,093,348
$20,226,748
8
236
$1,010,554
$19,133,400
7
228
$930,162
$18,122,846
8
221
$1,004,618
$17,192,684
8
213
$1,031,162
$16,188,066
8
205
$1,121,060
$15,156,904
7
197
$1,008,410
$14,035,844
9
190
$1,088,475
$13,027,434
15
181
$1,294,661
$11,938,959
10
166
$792,485
$10,644,298
8
156
$655,507
$9,851,813
9
148
$646,400
$9,196,306
8
139
$679,000
$8,549,906
11
131
$862,000
$7,870,906
7
120
$571,948
$7,008,906
9
113
$707,000
$6,436,958
8
104
$845,000
$5,729,958
96
$4,884,958

Projects

- or -

2019

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Project name   Grant recipient Grant amount Term
Acute Resuscitation In Paediatric SEpsis (ARISE-KIDS) - a randomised controlled trial to reduce morbidity and mortality due to sepsis in children   University of Queensland
$159,496
2
Application No: 2019-226Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Luregn Schlapbach
Project Title:
Acute Resuscitation In Paediatric SEpsis (ARISE-KIDS) - a randomised controlled trial to reduce morbidity and mortality due to sepsis in children
This study aims to establish effective treatment for sepsis in children. Sepsis is a disease caused by overwhelming infection, which kills more children than road traffic accidents and has a huge impact on patients, families, and society. The study will test the two most promising treatments for sepsis resuscitation in children, with the aim of reducing the number of deaths and improving long-term outcomes. The results are expected to inform best practice in Australia, and globally.
Gene therapy for infants with severe metabolic liver disorders using genome editing technology   Children's Medical Research Institute
$160,000
2
Application No: 2019-201Chief Investigator: Dr Samantha Ginn
Project Title:
Gene therapy for infants with severe metabolic liver disorders using genome editing technology
This project offers a unique opportunity to develop cutting-edge gene therapy treatments, and provide the foundations for a future clinical trial, in children with urea cycle disorders. We will exploit our privileged access to patient livers and elite AAV vector-based gene delivery systems to advance an innovative and clinically-relevant genome editing approach for infants with severe and often fatal genetic metabolic liver disease.
CORD BLOOD STEM CELL THERAPY FOR CHILDREN AT RISK OF HEART FAILURE DEATH   Murdoch Children's Research Institute
$160,000
2
Application No: 2019-137Chief Investigator: Associate Professor Salvatore Pepe
Project Title:
CORD BLOOD STEM CELL THERAPY FOR CHILDREN AT RISK OF HEART FAILURE DEATH
This study aims to reduce the high risk of heart failure and death faced by children with severe congenital or acquired heart diseases. This project will trial our unique cord blood stem cell therapy for safety and clinical capacity to stimulate normal heart muscle growth and improve heart function and survival in patients receiving cardiopulmonary bypass heart surgery to treat hypoplastic left heart syndrome (Norwood operation), or to treat dilated cardiomyopathy (ventricular assist device (VAD) surgical implantation).
Follow-up at two years of children at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia randomised to prophylactic oral dextrose gel or placebo gel. (hPOD-FU@2YR)   South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute
$158,588
2
Application No: 2019-127Chief Investigator: Professor Maria Makrides
Project Title:
Follow-up at two years of children at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia randomised to prophylactic oral dextrose gel or placebo gel. (hPOD-FU@2YR)
Low blood sugar levels in babies soon after birth are common and can cause brain damage. Dextrose gel rubbed into the inside of a baby€s cheek can treat low blood sugar. We want to find out if using the gel in at risk babies, to prevent low blood sugar levels from occurring in the first place, will improve the development of babies at 2 years of age and help prevent brain damage.
Discovery of a new treatment for childhood leukaemia   University of South Australia
$160,000
2
Application No: 2019-112Chief Investigator: Professor Shudong Wang
Project Title:
Discovery of a new treatment for childhood leukaemia
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents the deadliest form of blood cancer in children. Mutations in an enzyme called FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) are the most common molecular abnormalities of AML and confer a particularly poor prognosis. We have identified a highly potent and selective FLT3 inhibitor (CDDD5-5) that markedly increases the survival of AML-bearing animals. We will investigate how CDDD94 stops AML progression in cells and animal models. The outcome will allow rapid progress of CDDD5-5 towards the clinic.
Investigating a Potential Point of Care Test for Neonatal Sepsis   The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research & Public health Ltd
$99,500
2
Application No: 2019-098Chief Investigator: Dr Naomi Spotswood
Project Title:
Investigating a Potential Point of Care Test for Neonatal Sepsis
Sepsis affects more than 3 million neonates worldwide each year. We will measure the relative level of two proteins (biomarkers) in the blood of neonates who are being evaluated for sepsis, along with clinical parameters. These biomarkers are being used in development of a new €point of care€ sepsis test for use in adults, and this study will show whether the same biomarkers will be useful for neonates, with appropriate modification and/or inclusion of clinical parameters if required.
Preterm birth and the risk of mental health disorders in childhood and adolescence: identifying targets to intervene early   RMIT University
$152,199
2
Application No: 2019-083Chief Investigator: Dr Angela Cumberland
Project Title:
Preterm birth and the risk of mental health disorders in childhood and adolescence: identifying targets to intervene early
Prematurity at birth has life-long impacts on children and their families, including an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression. Exactly how preterm birth causes changes to the emotional centres of the brain as it grows and interconnects, leading to an increased risk of mental health problems, is unknown. Identifying the exact brain regions and how they are altered will aid in the development of improved pharmacological treatments and early behavioural interventions.
Total 2019    
$1,049,783